HP – Windows Keyboard shortcut – HP

HP PCs – Windows Keyboard Shortcuts

HP PCs – Windows Keyboard Shortcuts

This document pertains to HP products with a Microsoft Windows operating system.

Enhance your efficiency in Windows by memorizing and using keyboard shortcuts to perform routine tasks.Figure 1: A typical English keyboard layout (your keyboard might look different)

Number
Name
Feature or function
1
Caps Lock key
Activates/deactivates the Caps Lock feature.
2
Scroll Lock key
Activates/deactivates the Scroll Lock feature.
3
Num Lock key
Activates/deactivates the Num Lock feature.
4
Ctrl key
Use in combination with another key; its function depends on the application software you are using.
5
Windows key *
Opens the Start menu in Microsoft Windows. Use in combination with other keys to perform other functions.
6
Alt key
Use in combination with another key; its function depends on the application software you are using.
7
Application key*
Similar to the right mouse button, opens pop-up menus in a Microsoft Office application. May perform other functions in other software applications.
8
Editing keys
Includes the following: Insert , Home , Page Up , Delete , End , and Page Down .
Hold Ctrl and Alt while pressing Delete to restart the computer.
* Available in select geographic regions.

Keyboard shortcuts in Windows

The following table lists shortcuts to use in Windows.

Keystroke
Result
Windows key
Opens the Start menu.
Windows key + E
Opens Windows Explorer to My Computer.
Windows key + F
Searches for a file or folder.
Windows key + Ctrl + F
Searches for computers.
Windows key + L
Locks the computer.
Windows key + M
Minimizes all windows.
Windows key + Shift + M
Restores all minimized windows.
Windows key + R
Opens the Run dialog box.
Windows key + F1
Opens Help .
Windows key + Ctrl + F
Finds a computer.
Windows key + Ctrl + Tab
Moves focus from Start , to the Quick Launch toolbar, to the system tray. Use right arrow or left arrow keys to select items on the Quick Launch toolbar or system tray.
Windows key + Tab
Cycles through taskbar buttons.
Windows key + Break
Views the System Properties dialog box.
F1
Opens Help .
F10
Activates Menu Bar options.
Shift + F10
Opens a shortcut menu for the selected item. This is the same thing that happens when you right-click the mouse.
Ctrl + Esc
Opens the Start menu. From here, use the arrow keys to select an item, or press Tab to select the taskbar, or press Shift +F10 for a context menu (equivalent to right-clicking the mouse).
Ctrl + Shift + Esc
Opens Task Manager .
Ctrl + Tab
Switches to the next child window of a Multiple Document Interface (MDI) program.
Alt + F4
Closes the current window.
Alt + Esc
Switches between open items.
Alt + Tab
Switches to another open software program. Press and hold the Alt key and then press the Tab key to view the task-switching window. With the task switching window open, press Shift + Tab to cycle through the open programs in reverse order.
Alt + Space
Views the main window’s System menu (from the System menu, you can restore, move, resize, minimize, maximize, or close the window).
Alt + underlined letter in Menu
Opens the specified menu.

Keyboard shortcuts in Windows 8

Use the following information to navigate in Windows 8 using keyboard shortcuts.

NOTE: Many of the keyboard shortcuts from previous versions of Windows also work in the Desktop app in Windows 8.
Keystroke
Result
Windows key
Switches between Start Screen and the Desktop (or the last full screen application).
Windows key + C
Shows the Charms and the clock.
Windows key + H
Opens the Share charm.
Windows key + I
Opens the Settings charm.
Windows key + K
Opens the Devices charm.
Windows key + O
Turns the screen orientation lock on or off if your computer can detect screen orientation.
Windows key + W
Opens the Search charm with Settings selected.
Windows key + F
Opens the Search charm with Files selected.
Windows key + Q
Opens the Search charm with Apps selected.
Windows key + X
Opens the advanced menu on the Desktop or the Start Screen.
Windows key + Z
Opens commands for the current app.
Windows key + Tab
Shows the most recently used running apps and Start. Hold the Windows key and press Tab to move from app to app.
Windows key + Page up
Moves the Start screen to the left monitor in multi-monitor setups.
Windows key + Page down
Moves the Start screen to the right monitor in multi-monitor setups.
Windows key + Left arrow
On the desktop, moves a desktop app to the left half of the screen.
Windows key + Right arrow
On the desktop, moves a desktop app to the right half of the screen.
Windows key + Up arrow
On the desktop, maximizes the current window to full screen.
Windows key + Down arrow
On the desktop, minimizes or restores a current window.
Windows key + E
Opens File Explorer to Computer.
Windows key + R
Opens the Run dialog box.
Windows key + Pause/Break
Opens the Systems page.
Windows key + D
Shows or hides the desktop – minimizes or restores all windows.
Windows key + F1
Launches Windows Help and Support.
Windows key + Prt Scr (Print Screen)
Takes and saves screenshots instantly. Windows saves the screenshot to your Pictures folder as a PNG image file.
Alt + Tab
Shows all open apps. Hold Alt and press Tab to move from app to app.
Alt + F4
Closes the software you are currently using. If the Windows desktop is selected, the Windows Shut Down menu displays.
Ctrl + mouse wheel
Zooms – Hold down the Ctrl key on the keyboard while using the mouse wheel to grow or shrink an item on the screen.
Ctrl + . (period)
Moves one Start screen group to the right.
Ctrl + , (comma)
Moves one Start screen group to the left.

Keyboard shortcuts for Windows software programs

The following table lists shortcuts to use in Windows software programs.

Keystroke
Result
Ctrl + C
Copies selection.
Ctrl + X
Cuts selection.
Ctrl + V
Pastes selection.
Ctrl + Z
Undoes last action.
Ctrl + B
Bolds selection.
Ctrl + U
Underlines selection.
Ctrl + I
Italicizes selection.
F2
In Windows Explorer , renames the selected file.
F3
In Windows Explorer , opens Search.
Shift + Del (or Shift + Delete )
In Windows Explorer , deletes selected file without first moving it to the Recycle Bin.
Alt + Enter
Views the selected item’s Properties .
* (asterisk) on the numeric keypad
In Windows Explorer , expands everything under the current selection.
+ (plus sign) on the numeric keypad
In Windows Explorer , expands the current selection.
(minus sign) on the numeric keypad
In Windows Explorer , collapses the current selection.
Right arrow
In Windows Explorer , expands the current selection if it is not expanded, otherwise go to the first child folder.
Left arrow
In Windows Explorer , collapses the current selection if it is expanded, otherwise go to the parent folder.

Mouse clicks and keyboard combination shortcuts

Keystroke
Result
Shift + right click
Views a shortcut menu containing more commands.
Shift + double click
Runs the alternate default command (the second item on the menu).
ALT + double click
Views the selected item’s Properties .
Press and hold down the Ctrl key while you drag a file.
Copies a file to another folder. You can also do this in the original folder.
Press and hold Ctrl + Shift while you drag a file to the desktop or a folder.
Creates a shortcut on the desktop or in a folder.

Using keyboard shortcuts with Remote Desktop Connection

You can set up the remote computer to recognize Windows keyboard shortcuts that you type (for example, Alt + Tab ), or you can use Terminal Server keyboard shortcuts.

To use Windows keyboard shortcuts, follow these steps:

  1. Click to open Remote Desktop Connection .
  2. Click Options , and then click Local Resources .
  3. Under Keyboard , select On the remote computer to make the remote computer recognize the Windows keyboard shortcuts that you type.
    NOTE: If you use Remote Desktop Connection in full-screen mode, you can choose In full screen mode only to get the same result. This is the default setting.

Figure 2: Remote Desktop Connection – Local Resources tab

Remote Desktop Connection - Local Resources - Keyboard

To use Terminal Server shortcuts, refer to the following table:

Keystroke
Result
Alt + Page Up
Switches between programs from left to right.
Alt + Page Down
Switches between programs from right to left.
Alt + Insert
Cycles through programs in the order that they were opened.
Alt + Home
Displays the Start menu.
Ctrl + Alt + Break
Switches between a window and full screen.
Ctrl + Alt + End
Displays the Windows Security dialog box.
Alt + Delete
Displays the Windows menu.
Ctrl + Alt + Minus sign ( ) on the numeric keypad
Places a copy of the active window, within the client, on the Terminal Server clipboard. This key combination provides the same functionality as pressing Alt + Print Screen on a local computer.
Ctrl + Alt + Plus sign (+ ) on the numeric keypad
Places a copy of the entire client window area on the Terminal Server clipboard. This key combination provides the same functionality as pressing Print Screen on a local computer.
Ctrl + Alt + Right arrow
“Tabs” out of the Remote Desktop controls to a control in the host program such as a button or a text box. This is useful when the Remote Desktop controls are embedded in another (host) program.
Ctrl + Alt + Left arrow
“Tabs” out of the Remote Desktop controls to a control in the host program such as a button or a text box. This is useful when the Remote Desktop controls are embedded in another (host) program.
NOTE: Ctrl + Alt + Break and Ctrl + Alt + End are available in all Remote Desktop sessions, even when you have set up the remote computer to recognize Windows keyboard shortcuts.
Advertisements

The Citrix Blog repost: To infinity and beyond w/HP Moonshot for XenDesktop & a little wizardry!Xen

To infinity and beyond w/HP Moonshot for XenDesktop & a little wizardry! | Citrix Blogs<!– –>// // // <![CDATA[
jQuery(document).ready(function() {

Object.size = function(obj) {
var size = 0, key;
for (key in obj) {
if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) size++;
}
return size;
};

var customOrder = new Array("Filter by Language", "English" ,"Russian" ,"Spanish", "German", "French", "Japanese", "Chinese","Dutch", "Not Listed");
var dataArray = new Array();
for(var i = 0; i 0)
{
var strHTML = “”;
for(var j = 0; j < customOrder.length; ++j)
{
if (j == 1) {
strHTML += "
“+ customOrder[j] +””
} else {
strHTML += ”
“+ customOrder[j] +””
}
}
jQuery(“#cf-post-ajax-filter–language”).html(strHTML);
}
});

// ]]>

To infinity and beyond w/HP Moonshot for XenDesktop & a little wizardry!

HP Moonshot for XenDesktop

When the moon hits your eye like a big idea oh my that’s innovation…Or something like that.

YouTube link to XenDesktop and HP Moonshot wizard

Earlier in the year at Citrix Synergy 2014, I had a standing room only session where we presented the Moonshot for XenDesktop offering for the fist time and also talked about the new XenApp for Moonshot demo we just showed in the keynote earlier that day . One of the ideas we demonstrated during my session was the XenDesktop and HP Moonshot wizard for creating pooled physical desktops and also controlling power management for pooled physical desktops.

Currently XenDesktop uses the HCL function

To talk to the hypervisor management stack like System Center 2012R2 Virtual Machine Manager to provision virtual machines to and also control power of those virtual machines on HyperV. In the case of HP Moonshot there is no hypervisor which means there is no management stack so the question is then how do you provision pooled physical bare-metal desktops to PVS and control power without the hypervisor and the management stack?

In comes the the XenDesktop SDK and PVS PowerShell to allow us to have the same provisioning and power management without the hypervisor or management stack. Since that Synergy session the master of the QuickShadow code and long time Citrite Ronn Martin @Ronn_Martin has been hard at work building a new version of the Moonshot Wizard that we would love for our customers using HP Moonshot and XenDesktop 7.1, 7.5, and 7.6 to test. Of course we test our code as well so a special thanks to Patrick Brennan from Citrix for being my wingman testing and improving the code all these months. I couldn’t have done this without ya! While this is a great innovation concept between Citrix and HP it is not part of the native Citrix PVS or Studio console and is therefore considered unsupported. However, we welcome any feedback and will do our best to answer any technical questions that may arise using the forum link below.

The Moonshot Setup wizard for PVS can be downloaded using the url below:

•       This has been tested with PVS 7.1 and 7.6

https://msandcitrix.sharefile.com/d/se152eac29dc49548

The Moonshot power management for XenDesktop 7.1 can be downloaded using the url below:

https://citrix.sharefile.com/d/sac62f280738408b8  ( thanks to Ronn for getting that link to me!)

The Moonshot power management for XenDesktop 7.5 and 7.6 can be downloaded using the url below:

https://msandcitrix.sharefile.com/d/s2aa4f717603406a8

XenDesktop and HP Moonshot Wizard YouTube Demo

The  XenDesktop HP Moonshot tools provided  are not currently Citrix supported tools. Use of these tools should be tested carefully and  used in a lab environment. Any feedback or suggestions  should be entered into the following Citrix discussionsurl :

http://discussions.citrix.com/topic/357539-hp-moonshot/?_ga=1.182446823.1562980651.1412023442

Thank you and we look forward to your feedback! @TonySanchez_CTX

The Citrix Blog repost: The Eagle has Landed: Citrix XenApp is now available on HP Moonshot with Intel graphics!

The Eagle has Landed: Citrix XenApp is now available on HP Moonshot with Intel graphics! | Citrix Blogs<!– –>// // // <![CDATA[
jQuery(document).ready(function() {

Object.size = function(obj) {
var size = 0, key;
for (key in obj) {
if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) size++;
}
return size;
};

var customOrder = new Array("Filter by Language", "English" ,"Russian" ,"Spanish", "German", "French", "Japanese", "Chinese","Dutch", "Not Listed");
var dataArray = new Array();
for(var i = 0; i 0)
{
var strHTML = “”;
for(var j = 0; j < customOrder.length; ++j)
{
if (j == 1) {
strHTML += "
“+ customOrder[j] +””
} else {
strHTML += ”
“+ customOrder[j] +””
}
}
jQuery(“#cf-post-ajax-filter–language”).html(strHTML);
}
});

// ]]>

By Tony Sanchez · Published October 23, 2014

Hi Everyone,

My name is Tony Sanchez (@TonySanchez_CTX) and I work on the WW Alliances teams as principle solutions architect focusing on the HP Moonshot platform.

Citrix XenApp is now available on HP Moonshot with Intel graphics!Previously, I wrote a blog on the first Citrix and HP Moonshot offering with AMD called the CS100 for Citrix XenDesktop. Since then the HP Moonshot and Citrix family has grown and now for the first time Citrix XenApp 7.5 is available on the HP Moonshot platform! XenApp is powered by the new ProLiant m710 cartridge which is driven by Intel E3 chipset with integrated Iris Pro Graphics!

Many may ask what is so unique about Moonshot and what makes XenApp so special for this new hardware platform? Those are great questions that I’ll answer in this blog. Earlier in the year at Citrix Synergy 2014 we demonstrated the Moonshot ProLiant m710 for the first time publically with our partners HP and Intel. If you didn’t get a chance to see the demo I highly recommend that you check it out.  There was an immense amount of interest from customers and partners and since Synergy we have been working around the clock testing and building our new offering to enable a solution that is available today.

What’s impressive about HP Moonshot and this new ProLiant m710 cartridge is how we can enable an out- of-the-box experience to leverage the Intel Iris Pro Graphics for each XenApp user –all without having to use a hypervisor. This bare-metal architecture simplifies the setup time and deployment for XenApp without waiting on the underlying management platform to be enabled or a GPU to virtualized. With all that in mind let’s take a look at the ProLiant m710 and its Moonshot components and also share with you the secret sauce that technical people will care a lot about, the scalability performance data for medium and rich applications workloads.

Compute and Graphics

The HP ProLiant m710 is the first Moonshot cartridge that is powered by the Intel® Xeon E3-1284Lv3 processor with integrated Iris Pro Graphics P5200 graphics. With integrated on board processing and graphics you can now easily deliver on demand graphics for rich applications with Intel’s Iris Pro and for intense number crunching leverage the Turbo boost technology with speeds up to 3.2 Ghz. Delivering graphics in the past for rich applications or content that call for OpenGL, OpenCL, and Web GL has always been a challenge when graphics cards were not present. Now with a solution like the HP Moonshot ProLiant m710 for XenApp, a user has on demand enablement of graphics for those scenarios. In the past, IT needed to schedule time to take down servers and insert a GPU to enable that workload. With a micro server architecture like HP Moonshot and ProLiant m710 cartridge those challenges fade away.

With such a powerful and compact cartridge it surprising in how little this cartridge uses for watts. The ProLiant m710 cartridge requires only 19 watts to power it on which is about what a regular appliance light bulb uses so hopefully the light bulb is going on in your head about how power savings can start to come into play. For those that want all the processor data additional information about the Intel E3 chipset can be found here and Intel has a great blog about you should read as well.

Memory

Each ProLiant m710 is enabled with 4 SODIMM Slots with 8GB of DDR3L-1600 low voltage memory per slot for a total maximum configuration of 32GB RAM per cartridge. While 32GB of RAM is a smaller amount of memory than a full size blade, it enables you to create micro XenApp instances similar to what you would use in virtualized VM instance of XenApp, but without the hypervisor. Previous scalability tests performed by Citrix show that many virtualized instances on XenApp on a hypervisor have around 8GB to 32GB of virtual RAM assigned so having 32GB of physical RAM is not too far off from the hypervisor world. Of course mileage may vary as some customers choose higher amounts of virtual RAM for applications which require it so keep that in mind. With the RAM being physically assigned to each cartridge it simplifies the design and scalability process as there is no need to worry about overcommitting virtual RAM and impacts it may cause.
Additional Quick Specs information about the ProLiant m710 cartridge can be found here.

Network

Do you have a need for speed? The ProLiant m710 cartridge delivers integrated 2x 10gb Mellanox ConnectX®-3 network adapters with which also support RDMA over Converged Ethernet or RoCE. These adapters seamlessly integrate into the Intel QM87 chipset on the ProLiant m710 cartridge. With two 10gb adapters, the transfer speed for users accessing content such as videos, high resolution images, and large files are instantaneous.

The HP Moonshot-45XGc Switch Module

The HP Moonshot-45XGc Switch Module is designed to provide high speed, low-latency connectivity while dramatically reducing cost and complexity of deploying solutions at scale. The 45G Switch Module, together with the HP Moonshot-4QSFP+ uplink module, provide 10GbE network connections to cartridges within the HP Moonshot 1500 chassis. Up to two switch modules are supported in each chassis. Multiple modules can be stacked to eliminate the cost of TOR switches and provide failover in the event of a switch or uplink failure.

More Quick Specs information about the 45XGc switch module can be found here.

Storage

Each ProLiant m710 is enabled with a Micron M500 120GB M.2 NGFF or Next Generation Form Factor NAND, drive for fast reads and writes for the operating systems while only consuming around 3.3 volts of power. Each M.2 also leverages the adaptive thermal throttling technology which allows the drive reduce its temperature if it’s being stressed. The maximum random reads for the M.2 is rate around 500 MB/s with the writes at 130 MB/s and a total MT/s of 6.0GB/s. The screenshot below shows a few SSD tests from Blackmagicdesign, CrystalDiskMark, and ATTO Disk Benchmark applications.

Scalability

Of course the question on everyone mind is “how does it scale”? As I mentioned earlier the performance data gathered from the HP Moonshot chassis manager, as well from Perfmon counters, are critical when analyzing the overall chassis and XenApp user experience. Performing scalability tests are mandatory to see how well a system handles from a steady state to fully loaded active state for XenApp. Each test gathered data from common areas such as CPU, RAM, IOPS, network and of course power. For this test Citrix and HP leveraged industry standard tools from Login VSI version 4.1 to help with creating a 2400 user synthetic test. We attempted to ask 2400 people on Facebook if they would participate, but everyone was busy so we created 2400 friends of our own to test ☺. There were two types of workloads leveraged for the tests, the medium and the rich application workload. An explanation of each workload and its applications are below. Each test was executed using 1, 15, 30, and 45 cartridge loads to ensure that a partially to fully loaded chassis was utilized. For this blog we will only focus on the 1 and 45 cartridge scalability numbers. All of the information below can be found in the technical whitepaper  HP for Moonshot for XenApp coming soon which I highly recommend that you read.

Medium Workload

This section describes the medium workload profile, used to evaluate XenApp performance on HP Moonshot with HP ProLiant m710 Server Cartridges. The medium workload is the default workload in Login VSI. This workload emulates a medium knowledge worker using Microsoft Office 2013, Microsoft Internet Explorer, PDFs, and Java/FreeMind.

Rich Application Workload

A separate application workload was designed to evaluate XenApp performance on HP Moonshot with HP ProLiant m710 Server Cartridges when running rich and graphics-intensive applications. This workload executes the GPU-enhanced features of Adobe Photoshop CC 2014 and manipulates a 3D model in eDrawings Viewer. The GPU-enhanced features of Adobe Photoshop include the Blur Gallery, Smart Blur, Upscale, Smart Sharpen, Lighting Effects, Rotate, and Scrubby Zoom, to name a few. The GPU uses OpenGL (Open Graphics Library) to render and accelerate 2D and 3D graphics and OpenCL (Open Computing Language) for parallel processing acceleration.

The rich application workload consists of three segments:
• Segment 1 runs OpenGL, OpenCL, and Zoom tests (via Adobe) in Photoshop CC 2014.
• Segment 2 opens a 3D assembly file and rotates, expands, and collapses the file multiple times.
• Segment 3 uses Scrubby Zoom to zoom in and out of an image multiple times.

The OpenGL test loads an image, applies Lighting Effects and Smart Blur, rotates the image, scales the image, applies Motion Blur, and finally applies Lighting Effects again. The OpenCL test loads an image, and then applies the Field Blur, Iris Blur, and Tilt Blur filters from the Blur Gallery. The Zoom test loads an image, and then uses Scrubby Zoom to rapidly zoom in and out of an image for 30 seconds. The image manipulated is a 17-megapixel, 48-MB TIF file. The 3D assembly file is a 63-component, 2-MB EASM file.

Single Cartridge Performance Data

Figure 4 shows the baseline response time vs. the number of user sessions for a single HP ProLiant m710 Server Cartridge in the XenApp delivery group. A VSI max of 50 XenApp users was achieved for this test.

Figure 4.

Figure 8 shows that the number of user sessions increases linearly as the number of cartridges increases, with response time remaining almost constant. This shows a high scalability of over 2,300 XenApp users in one chassis!

Figure 9 characterizes processor utilization of the HP ProLiant m710 Server Cartridge. When the number of sessions approaches 49 or 50, CPU utilization goes up to 100 percent; when the user sessions start to log off, CPU utilization goes down.

Figure 10 characterizes power utilization of the HP ProLiant m710 Server Cartridge. The maximum power rating on each cartridge is less than 75 Watts at peak load. However, with the XenApp medium workload, the power utilization is ~60 Watts per cartridge at peak load.

Figure 12 characterizes main memory utilization of the HP ProLiant m710 Server Cartridge. Notice that 32 GB memory is not saturated, even at peak workload (when the maximum number of user sessions is running). Also note that 6–8 GB of memory is free at peak workload.

Figure 13 characterizes network utilization of the HP ProLiant m710 Server Cartridge. Notice that the network does not create a bottleneck. Even at the peak workload (when the maximum number of user sessions is running), the network utilization remains below 130 Mb/s. The ProLiant m710 Server Cartridge has a 10 Gbps network.

Rich Application Workload

Figure 16 through Figure 19 show an indicative test from each data point in Figure 15. Note that the numbers do not match exactly, as Figure 18 contains averages across multiple tests. Figure 20 through 25 plot the system-level parameters— power consumption, GPU utilization, CPU utilization, memory utilization, and disk operations—during the execution of 100 percent rich application workload on the HP ProLiant m710 Server Cartridge.

Summary

Throughout all these tests the performance was very predictable and the results scaled linearly which provides validation and confidence that the HP Proliant m710 cartridge can handle a multitude of XenApp applications even up to intense graphical applications that leverage the GPU on demand. It’s important to note that while a single Moonshot chassis can easily accommodate 2,000 or more XenApp users, “mileage” may vary so performing your own tests will help you decide the scalability limits in your own environment. Of course all this great testing and information that is provided to you today couldn’t have been done without the help of some great guys at HP.

I would like to acknowledge Supreeth Venkatesh (@SupreethPSV) and Zach Bitting (@Zachbitting) for all their dedication on working on this project. You can reach the Moonshot solutions team at HP via @HP_MSE as well. We hope that this blog was informative and will allow you to see that HP Moonshot with XenApp can deliver and impressive user experience with break through economics. In my next blog we will look at the architecture building blocks for the infrastructure such as PVS, NetScaler, WDS, HP CMU, and other key components. It’s definitely been one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind with this new architecture so stay tuned for more…

Less really can be more when it comes to desktop virtualization. 180 PC-on-a-Chip desktops—minus the hypervisor—with Citrix XenDesktop, HP Moonshot, and AMD. Part 1

Less really can be more when it comes to desktop virtualization. 180 PC-on-a-Chip desktops—minus the hypervisor—with Citrix XenDesktop, HP Moonshot, and AMD. Part 1 | Citrix Blogs

Source: The Citrix Blog

//

 

Less really can be more when it comes to desktop virtualization. 180 PC-on-a-Chip desktops—minus the hypervisor—with Citrix XenDesktop, HP Moonshot, and AMD. Part 1

Last week at HP Discover in Barcelona, Spain, HP unveiled a revolutionary new member of the Moonshot platform called the Converged System 100 for Hosted Desktops designed exclusively with AMD for Citrix XenDesktop. This new architecture is unlike anything else the industry and Citrix was there side-by-side on the show floor unveiling this new jointly designed platform to customers and partners. The interest from attendees was unbelievable and the simplicity of this new platform with XenDesktop and Provisioning Services made attendees really understand that desktop virtualization can be made simpler with an architecture like this. Let’s take a look at the hardware and dive deeper into this new and exciting game changing architecture.

Chassis

The Moonshot 1500 platform is a 4.3U chassis that has an impressive array of compute, graphics, storage, and network. This new Proliant M700 Server cartridge for HDI, or Hosted Desktop Infrastructure, was designed for those key knowledge workers that need direct unfiltered access to hardware that has been traditionally managed by a hypervisor in the VDI world.  By providing this level of hardware access users can be assured that they will not have to share any hardware resources with anyone else that could potentially impact others in a traditional VDI architecture.  With this new architecture users now have access to their own dedicated processors, graphics, storage, and networking which increases the user experience and ultimately productivity.

Inside the Moonshot chassis are 45 dedicated plug-n-play M700 server cartridges. Each M700 cartridge has 4 PC-on-a-Chip nodes or systems that are powered by the chassis. With 4 PC-on-a Chip nodes X 45 cartridges that gives us a total of 180 dedicated PCoC systems. Each cartridge consumes an impressive low wattage amount of power that is typically 33 watts in active use, 20 watts at idle and a maximum of 63 watts. That’s about 8 watts per node on average which is equivalent to a small radio, but with the power and HDX experience of a boom box! For an entire chassis then the total amount of power that these 45 cartridges or 180 nodes  would consume on average is about 1500 watts which is about the equivalent of a home appliance microwave. Of course mileage may vary, but you get the point on how power savings can be applied here.

The image below showcases the Moonshot chassis fully loaded with 45 cartridges.

 

 

 

Cartridges

Each HP Proliant m700 is powered by a PC-on-a-Chip architecture designed by HP and AMD. Each node on a cartridge has an AMD Opteron X2150 APU (4) x86 core 1.5 GHz processor with AMD Radeon 8000 Series Graphics. The graphics and processor are a single piece of silicon die called an Accelerated Processing Unit or APU and offer 128 Radeon Cores up to 500 MHz.  This type of graphics card is perfectly designed for the knowledge worker who has light level graphics requirements like Direct X 11 enabled applications such as Microsoft Office 2013. This allows for a smaller footprint for a SOC and provides HP and AMD the flexibility to have 4 nodes per cartridge. Each node has a dedicated 8GB of Enhanced ECC DDR3 PC3-12800 SDRAM at 16000 MHz speed for a total of 32GB per cartridge. For storage each cartridge has an integrated storage controller with a dedicated 32GB SANDISK iSSD per node located on the Mezzanine Storage Kit for a total of 128GB space. Each iSSD is rated to perform up to 400 IOPS which more than sufficient for most traditional VDI or SBC users. Each node also has its own pair of 1GB Broadcom NICS allowing for a combined 2GB of dedicated network bandwidth per node. This makes for greater design choices for allowing node to have access to different VLANS for boot and production traffic if desired. For node deployment the BIOS allows each node for a series of simple boot methods such as boot via local iSSD, boot via PXE, and boot one time via PXE or HDD. Also each of the m700 nodes have the capability to leverage Wake-On-LAN or WOL using a magic packet. This enables even nodes that are powered off in the chassis to be powered on straight from the Provisioning Services console!

 

Networking

Inside the chassis is a simple and easy to leverage series of integrated switches. There are two switches that are segmented as switch A and switch B. Each Wolff switch can provide up to 4 x 40GB of stackable uplinks per switch. These Wolff switches are fully manageable switches with Layer 2 and Layer 3 routing functionality as well as QoS, SNMP and SFLOW functions. With each node having a 2 dedicated 1GB NICS and each cartridge delivering 8GB of potential traffic, these switches are ready to handle any type of HDI workload scenario.

 

XenDesktop and HDX

So far you have read about the hardware and its exciting capabilities, but is there a specific version of XenDesktop for the Moonshot platform? Yes there is. The HP Converged System 100 will only be supported by Citrix for those customers using XenDesktop 7.1 and Provisioning Services 7.1. While it’s possible that previous versions of XenDesktop may work, the main feature that only XenDesktop 7.1 provides is the capability for the Standard VDA to leverage the native GPU for those Direct X enabled applications, for example, without the need of the HDX 3D Pro VDA that was always the case before for leveraging GPUs. (The HDX 3d Pro VDA is required for higher end CAD applications, which also require a higher end GPU than what is inside the M700 cartridge. Think NVIDIA K2 and XenServer GPU pass through with HP BL380 Gen 8 blades here for HDX 3D Pro for those higher end users which is a separate architecture than Moonshot.) For those of us that have been keeping up to speed with XenDesktop, Derek Thorslund posted great blog about what the XenDesktop 7.1 VDA can provide for native graphics. Throughout the development of the Moonshot platform Citrix, HP, and AMD worked very closely on the HDX side. During this time Citrix developers were able to enhance our current 7.1 Standard VDA WDDM driver to be able to provide optimizations that are now capable of leveraging the AMD graphics cards which are a standard on the Moonshot HDI platform. This new WDDM driver enhancement now allows for a superior HDX experience that can directly leverage the GPU for each node! The example below shows the device manager Citrix WDDM driver as well as the AMD Radeon GPU. It is important to note again that this new AMD optimization is specifically designed and supported for the XenDesktop 7.1 standard VDA only and not the HDX 3D Pro VDA which is not supported by Citrix on the CS100 Moonshot platform at the time of writing this article.  This new enhancement is in the form of a hotfix (MSP) is available now on Citrix.com.

 http://support.citrix.com/article/CTX139622

http://support.citrix.com/article/CTX139621

Below is YouTube demonstration showcasing all these pieces in real-time!

XenDesktop on Moonshot

Direct URL also

180 bare-metal nodes to Windows 7 in minutes

In most situations there are going to be a few ways to deliver Windows to bare-metal nodes before the XenDesktop and Provisioning Services client installers can be deployed. The current HP supported method of delivering Windows 7 x64 to a node is using Windows Deployment Services or WDS. WDS is a free role of the Windows 2008R2 SP1 and Windows 2012/R2 operating system that can be enabled. Once we have our master image created the fun part begins. In the next series I’ll show the simple process of leveraging WDS to deploy Windows 7 to our master node in just a matter of a few minutes. Then I’ll demonstrate the PowerShell capabilities from Moonshot to PVS and how were able to build all 180 nodes just with PVS and Studio. More to come so check back soon….

Thank You

@TonySanchez_CTX

MyXenApp

A blog dedicated to Citrix technology

There's More to the Story: a blog about LIFE, chronic illness, and Mental Health

I’m the loud and relentless "patient" voice and advocate they warned you about. I happen to have type 1 diabetes, ADHD, anxiety, OCD, PCOS, endometriosis, thyroid issues, asthma, allergies, lactose intolerance (and more), but there’s more to story.

DeployWindows

Learn Troubleshoot and Manage Windows

Dirk & Brad's Windows Blog

Microsoft Platform How To's, Best Practices, and other Shenanigans from Highly-qualified Windows Dorks.

Ingmar Verheij

About Citrix, Remote Desktop, Performance, Workspace, Monitoring and more...

Virtual to the Core

Virtualization blog, the Italian way.

CloudPundit: Massive-Scale Computing

the business of Internet infrastructure, cloud computing, and data centers

UCSguru.com

Every Cloud Has a Tin Lining.

speakvirtual

See no physical, hear no physical, speak no physical - speakvirtual.com

IT BLOOD PRESSURE

IT can be easy

Ask the Architect

My workspace journey

blog.scottlowe.org

The weblog of an IT pro specializing in virtualization, storage, and servers

akosijesyang

a place under control of his big head

this is... The Neighborhood

the Story within the Story

Yellow Bricks

by Duncan Epping

THE SAN GUY

Enterprise Storage Engineer

My Virtual Vision

My thoughts on application delivery